Volunteer-A-Thon

Let's get 100 volunteer hours as a community this month! 

141.5 Hours Have Been Donated So Far!

Hours last updated August 27

VIRTUAL VOLUNTEER OPpoRTUNITIES

FOOD 

INSECURITY/

HOMeLESSNESS

  •  Lighthouse Food Pantry  Support Morning Star's Lighthouse Pantry by volunteering at least once a month. From packing bags, handing them out, directing traffic and all points in between. There are many places to help make a difference.  

  • Missing Maps Participate in an open, collaborative project to map areas where humanitarian organizations are trying to meet the needs of vulnerable people.

LGBTQIA+

  • The Trevor Project Support LGBTQIA+ youth by joining The Trevor Project’s crisis text and chat programs.

CHILDREN'S

WELFARE

  • The Happy Hope Factory Record yourself reading a children’s book in English or Spanish for a video library of stories for hospitalized children.

 

  • Career Village Answer questions and give advice to students interested in your field of study and career, through this free platform that connects students to real-life professionals.

  • buildOn Participate in a weekly virtual service project via Instagram to empower urban youth to transform their neighborhoods through intensive community service.

  • iMentor Mentor a high school student through iMentor’s college readiness mentorship program.

  • CodePath.org Provide guidance to a student as they prep for interviews, evaluate job opportunities, and pursue meaningful careers in tech by mentoring students leading workshops, or co-hosting events.

IMMIGRATION

RIGHTS

  • Tarjimly Multilingual volunteers can download the Tarjimly app and connect with refugees or immigrants that need documents or other items translated.

  • Upwardly Global Support immigrant job seekers in your field through informational interviews, mock interviews, and English language coaching to help them secure a job.

ANTI-RACISM

Sourced from 75 Things White People Can Do for Racial Justice

  • Google whether your local police department currently outfits all on-duty police officers with a body-worn camera and requires that the body-worn camera be turned on immediately when officers respond to a police call. If they don’t, write to your city or town government representative and police chief to advocate for it. The racial make-up of your town doesn’t matter—this needs to be standard everywhere. Multiply your voice by soliciting others to advocate as well, writing on social media about it, writing op-eds, etc.

  • Google whether your city or town currently employs evidence-based police de-escalation trainings. The racial make-up of your town doesn’t matter—this needs to be standard everywhere. Write to your city or town government representative and police chief and advocate for it. Multiply your voice by soliciting others to advocate as well, writing on social media about it, writing op-eds, etc.

  • More and more stories of black folks encountering racism are being documented and shared through social media—whether it’s at a hotel, with the police, in a coffee shop, at a school, etc. When you see such a post, call the organization, company, or institution involved to tell them how upset you are. Then share the post along with the institution’s contact information, spreading the word about what happened and encouraging others to contact the institution as well. Whether the company initiated the event or failed to protect a POC during an onslaught by a third party, they need to hear from us.

  • Read up about mandatory minimum sentences and watch videos about this on Families Against Mandatory Minimums (FAMM’s) website. FAMM’s website includes work being done at the federal level and state level. Call or write to your state legislators and governor about reducing mandatory minimum sentences for non-violent drug crimes.

  • To reduce mandatory minimum sentences on a federal level, call or write to your federal legislators in support of the bipartisan (sponsored by Sen Lee (R-UT)) Smarter Sentencing Act (S. 2850) which reduces the length of federal mandatory minimum drug sentences by half, makes the Fair Sentencing Act’s crack sentencing reforms retroactive, and expands the “safety valve” exception to mandatory drug sentences.

  • To reduce mandatory minimum sentences on a federal level, call or write to your federal legislators in support of the bipartisan (sponsored by Sen Rand (R-KY)) Justice Safety Valve Act (S. 399, H.R. 1097), which would allow judges to give sentences other than the mandatory minimum sentence for any federal crime.

  • To reduce mandatory minimum sentences on a federal level, call or write your federal legislators in support of another great criminal justice reform bill, the Second Look Act, which would make reduced sentences for crack convictions from the previously passed Fair Sentencing Act retroactive, reduce mandatory minimums for people convicted more than three times for drug crimes from life without parole after the third offense to 25 years, reduce mandatory sentences for drug crimes from 15 to 10 years, limit the use of solitary confinement on juvenile prisoners, etc.

  • Call or write to your state legislators and governor to support state-wide criminal justice reform including reducing mandatory minimum sentences, reducing sentences for non-violent drug crimes, passing “safety valve” law to allow judges to depart below a mandatory minimum sentence under certain conditions, passing alternatives to incarceration, etc. Study after study shows that racism fuels racial disparities in imprisonment, and most of the US prison population are at the state and local level.

  • Call or write to state legislators, federal legislators, and your governor to decriminalize weed. No, not because black folks use weed more frequently than white folks. Because black Americans are arrested for marijuana possession far more frequently than whites.

  • Call or write to state legislators to require racial impact statements be required for all criminal justice bills. Most states already require fiscal and environmental impact statements for certain legislation. Racial impact statements evaluate if a bill may create or exacerbate racial disparities should the bill become law. Check out the status of your state’s legislation surrounding these statements here.

  • Call or write to state legislators, federal legislators, and your governor to end solitary confinement in excess of 15 days. It is considered torture by the UN, and it is used more frequently on black and Hispanic prisoners. For more information on solitary, two good overviews can be found here and here.

  • Call or write to your national legislators, state legislators, and governor in favor of affirmative action. Encourage friends to do the same.

  • Write to your college/university about implementing all or some of these diversity strategies that effectively promote racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic diversity on campus. Write to the public universities your tax payer dollars support about implementing these diversity strategies.

  • Write to the US Sentencing Commission (PubAffairs@ussc.gov) and ask them to:

    • reform the career offender guideline to lessen the length of sentences

    • change the guidelines so that more people get probation

    • change the criminal history guidelines so that a person’s criminal record counts against them less

    • change guidelines to reduce mandatory minimum sentences for non-violent crimes

    • conduct a study to review the impact of parental incarceration on minor children. With more data, the Commission could modify the Sentencing Guidelines and allow judges to take this factor into account when sentencing individuals for non-violent crimes.

    • conduct a study to review whether the Bureau of Prisons is following the Commission’s encouragement to file a motion for compassionate release whenever “extraordinary and compelling reasons” exist.

    • consider amending the guidelines to reduce sentences for first offenders.

  • Write to your city or town government representative to replace Columbus Day with Indigenous People’s Day like these cities did.

  • Write to your city or town government representative to divest from banks that are financing the Dakota Access Pipeline, private prisons, and detention centers. Seattle and Davis, CA already did, as well as Los Angeles, and there are campaigns going on in many cities to divest. Start here: http://howtodivest.org/

  • Write to your state legislators to end cash bail. It means that a someone who is legally innocent is put in jail because they can’t afford bail. It means that a defendant can be released pre-trial because of their wealth, not how much of a flight risk they are. It puts more people in detention (which tax payers pay for) and affects a defendants’ ability to maintain employment, access mental and physical healthcare, and be in communication with their family and friends, etc. Housing the approximately 500,000 people in jail in the US awaiting trial who cannot afford bail costs US taxpayers $9 billion a year.

 

MORE WAYS

TO HELP

  • Taproot Plus Use your talents and skills to help non-profits further their missions through project-based assignments. Find a project that fits your skill set for an organization and apply to participate.

  • American Red Cross Explore a number of impactful ways you can volunteer for the American Red Cross by entering your zip code and then “virtual” into the keyword search on the next page.

  • Be My Eyes Download this free app that connects people who are blind or have low vision with sighted volunteers for visual assistance through a live video call.

  • Library of Congress Improve access to history by transcribing, reviewing, and tagging Library of Congress documents. Help the Library of Congress make its document catalog searchable.

  • Smithsonian Digital Transcription Center Work hand-in-hand with digital volunteers to transcribe the Smithsonian Institute’s historic documents and collection records to facilitate research and excite the learning in everyone.

  • LibriVox Read and record chapters of books in the public domain no longer under copyright and make them available for free on the Internet.

Thank you to Belong Church Denver for the inspiration and the information on this page.

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2941 Morning Star Dr Las Cruces, NM 88011

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